Blessed New Year!

Wow, it’s been 6 months since we blogged, but to us it sure doesn’t feel that long ago! Time’s zooming by really quickly – due to various home and work events that have come and gone. But we do know a bunch of friends who are living a life of absolute bliss and tranquility.

Yes, we’re talking about our composting worms!

Over the past 12 months, they have done nothing but eat (a lot) and populate in a box placed in a corner of our kitchen. They have also largely remained untouched and unperturbed, as my dad has told everyone “not to anyhow touch the worms”. 😛

My dad has also been frequently feeding them with moist shredded newspapers and raw kitchen peels. (He cooks quite frequently.) As such, it is no wonder that these gentle discrete creatures have grown to a pretty sizeable population!

Every now and then, we would peek into the box and easily spot at least ten of them near the surface. (Note: We used to only have a few survivors since our nightmarish worm incident last year.)

Here are some recent snapshots of our worm bin. Enjoy!

Pictures taken on January 6, 2013

Worm bin in the corner of the kitchen - it's been there for a year and completely hassle free

Worm bin in the corner of the kitchen – it’s been there for a year and completely hassle free! We placed the bin on a kitchen trolley to maximise space, as we can easily put other items on the lower levels (i.e. yellow spray bottle filled with aged water)

Notice that the bin is slightly inclined. This allows excess liquids to flow to the lowest corner of the bin. This way, the worms can ‘migrate’ to drier areas of the bin without being forced to drown in their own wet poop…

An LED lamp just above the worm bin. As composting worms tend to dislike bright places, this helps to prevent worms from trying to climb out of the bin. We usually keep this switched on most parts of the day as our kitchen is quite dim even during daytime. To save electricity, you can attach the lamp to an automatic timer so that it can be switched on and off during specific timings. Use LED lamps as they emit cool light - remember that worms hate hot places!

An LED lamp clipped just above the worm bin. As composting worms tend to dislike bright places, this helps to prevent them from trying to climb out of the bin. We usually keep this switched on most parts of the day, as our kitchen is quite dim even during daytime. To save electricity, you can attach the lamp to an automatic timer so that it will switch on/off only during specific set timings. Use LED lamps only as they emit cool light – composting worms WILL escape if the bin gets too hot!

Drilled holes on the lid. This way, the worms get enough air and aeration. This keeps the bin smelling nice (an anaerobic bin will stink) and the worms will remain happy since they have sufficient oxygen to thrive.

Drilled holes on the lid. This way, the worms get enough air and aeration. This keeps the bin smelling nice (an anaerobic bin means a smelly bin) and the worms will remain happy since they have sufficient oxygen to thrive.

A peek into the worm bin! If you are new to composting, you may not like what you see. But to composting enthusiasts, this is a good picture to behold!

A peek into the worm bin! If you are new to composting, you may not like what you see. But to composting enthusiasts, this is a great picture to behold!

A closer look: unwanted raw vegetable kitchen scraps, moist shredded newspaper, and worm casts (vermicomposting) eeeeverrryywheerree (:

A closer look: Unwanted raw kitchen scraps, moist shredded newspaper, and worm casts (vermicompost) eeeeverrryywheerree (:

Can you see a couple of worms? They appear brownish-red on the picture.

Can you see a couple of worms? They appear brownish-red on the picture.

Happy worms amongst sooo much food!

Happy worms amongst sooo much food!

Pictures taken on January 24, 2013

Worm casts, worm casts, everywhere. The composting worms have been working hard on turning our household trash into great fertiliser!

Worm casts, worm casts, everywhere. The composting worms have indeed been working hard on turning our household trash into great fertiliser!

Beautiful, isn't it? :)

Beautiful, isn’t it? 🙂

A closer look at an unwanted lettuce part which my dad threw into the worm bin. It started growing new leaves instead! LOL

A closer look at an unwanted lettuce scrap which my dad threw into the worm bin. It started growing fresh new leaves instead! LOL

"Hello, you may not know me, but I'm your friend. So call me, maybe?"

“Hello, you may not know me, but I’m your friend. So call me, maybe?”

Worms galore

Worms galore

Rich, fresh fertiliser!

Rich, fresh fertiliser!

Click here to view how our bin looked like when we first started vermicomposting. It’s 100% unrecognisable!

We also shot a couple of videos of our composting worms in action. We’ll try to upload them as soon as possible. [Update: Here it is!]

Have a great weekend ahead! 🙂

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2 responses »

  1. woo kok wai says:

    Hi would like to find out from you where do you get your worms and the container for the compost. Am planning to get materials to setup the worm composting
    Best regards
    Kok wai

  2. Sarah says:

    Hi Kok Wai, thank you for taking time to drop us an enquiry. Your questions have been frequently asked by others before, and we’ve posted our response in the following 2 links:

    http://bit.ly/1vbmj8i
    http://bit.ly/1unQMhv

    Hope this helps, and happy composting!

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